Wisconsin Economic Development Guide

2015-2016

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W I S C O N S I N E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E 47 ith a rich history of brewing beer, it's no wonder Wisconsin is the water capital of the world. Milwaukee is an historic city with access to high-quality and abundant freshwater through its proximity to Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. "Water fows through every step of the brewing process, from the barley feld to the bottling line," says Kim Marrota, director of sustainability for MillerCoors. When Fredrick Miller arrived in Milwaukee, he noted the business potential for its great harbor and the ability to source from surrounding farmland — two reasons why he founded Miller Brewing Company there in 1855. Numerous companies have chosen Wisconsin for its innovative water practices ever since. The Blue Economy With over 300 water technology companies employing 37,000 people and registering $5.7 billion in annual sales, it's obvious why Wisconsin is called the water capital of the world. Milwaukee is one of only two North W W A T E R T E C H N O L O G Y Sunset over Sand Island Photo by Jeff Peters How Wisconsin became the water capital of the world b y C R Y S TA L M E D L E R A Thirst for More

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